Very thought provoking article

Before you start to worry that Bella has somehow gotten lost and found her way under my house, don’t worry. She’s fine, apart from some minor digestive complaints she’s had lately. The dog to which the title of this article refers is another one entirely, one I only discovered recently due to unusual circumstances and […]

via So There’s a Dog in My Floorboards — Mark All My Words

More Treats for my Readers!

Tonight, I give you one of the creepiest ways to enjoy a story – by sound.  I found a page with some wonderful, creepy old radio dramas.  Listen to them with the lights out – if you dare.

https://nitratediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/01/31-scary-old-time-radio-episodes-halloween/

https://nitratediva.wordpress.com/2016/10/01/fear-you-can-hear-more-scary-radio/

 

foley-and-grinder-1000

Improve your drawings – with one simple trick!

Happy Inktober Day number 26!  I missed yesterday so today’s a tip, too.
If you are drawing anything with hard edges, your work will look so much better if you use sharp, clean lines and good perspective. So, how can an enterprising artist keep their fluid, natural lines and combine them with correct mechanical structures without the whole thing looking stiff?

I find that what works best is to rough out my drawing in pencil, so that things still look natural, and then use a clear plastic ruler to redraw anything that needs to be exact. Simple!

That way the woman at the table can still have her beautiful, flowing hair and her frilly dress, but the stripes on her tablecloth will be even and the legs straight. Or the wild horses can still look dynamic and three dimensional, while the old fence posts they are standing near still stand straight and tall with good parallel lines. Think of how the impact might be different if those posts were drawn with wavering unrealistic lines. A great opportunity for contrast would be completely lost.
Paying some attention to how things are really shaped, even in your sketches, will give your work a more grounded, realistic look and bring a hint of professionalism. To me, nothing is sadder than seeing an artist draw a really beautiful figure, animal, or natural landscape – then completely ignore the structure of the piece, so the setting looks skewed and lopsided because none of lines are straight, even when they are supposed to be. It’s a fast way to ruin an otherwise beautiful work.
Best of all, this problem is not only easy to fix, but helps train your eye to be a better artist!

Day 0: Blogging Tools to Help You Work Faster, Write Better, and Land More Readers — BayArt

Blogging is an art, and using the right blogging tools will make your art rise and shine! This is an epic list of blogging tools to which you can refer, and find new tools to enhance your blogging experience as well as the experience of your readers! This epic list of blogging tools consists of…

via Day 0: Blogging Tools to Help You Work Faster, Write Better, and Land More Readers — BayArt

From Subdued to Superb

via Daily Prompt: Subdued

 

I love taking pictures of the moon, and I finally have a camera that will do it, however the photos are often grainy.  What’s an amateur lunar photographer to do, especially on an evening when there’s obstructions in the way, but that moon coming up over the city is so beautiful?

Photoshop?

Not for me – I use GIMP, the free art program.

Through judicious use of the clonestamp, fuzzy select, gaussian blur, and layers features this subdued image was totally rehabbed.  Clone stamping near parts of the sky got rid of the power line, selecting just the moon itself then putting it on another layer so we could blur the rest got rid of all those speckles, and a simple “white balance”operation cleared up much of the atmospheric haze on the moon itself.

Here’s a better view.

original shopped moon 1000.JPG

shopped - I can't see the pixels 1000.JPG

 

DIY Camera Monopod

I wanted to take a picture of the moon last night the same as I did two nights ago, but it wasn’t in the right position to use my usual trick of bracing my camera on the back fence.  Still, the sheer beauty of the moon as it peeked through the treetops made me find a way, and it worked well enough that I wanted to share it here.

I sat in a chair so that part of me was braced, and for a monopod I used a sponge mop!  It was dry, so no harm done to the camera.  However it worked well enough that I was able to get several shots of the moon.  At maximum zoom, it’s of course rather hard to hold still, and this little help was invaluable.   The spongy texture was stiff enough to support my hands and the camera, and soft enough not to scratch the finish, and the pole handle made a sturdy base that I could angle as I liked.

The featured image shows my result.  Still not perfect, but my camera isn’t a fancy expensive one and I was doing without a tripod or telescope.  I’m happy with it!