Juxtaposition

jux·ta·po·si·tion
ˌjəkstəpəˈziSH(ə)n/
noun
noun: juxtaposition; plural noun: juxtapositions
  1. the fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect.
    “the juxtaposition of these two images”

This is a rather useful concept in art.  The contrast of opposites can really help bring out the idea you are trying to communicate.  In this sketch, for example, I have a Twi’lek woman fleeing from a massive ship that is just coming in to land.  I was tempted to set the scene at a bloody sunset.  Instead made the sky a clear blue through the clouds of dust as a way of alluding to the shattered peace this ship has caused.  Whether or not my art was effective, juxtaposition is something to keep in mind as a form of contrast.

extermination ship adjusted.png

 

 

via Daily Prompt: Juxtapose

Contrasting Black

If you talk to some painters, they will tell you that black is an unnatural color and it shouldn’t be used.  I’m not one of them, I use black even in paintings with color.  Personally, I think black is essential, and a dash of it will really help everything else be more visible.  Black is really great if you want some drama, as in the photo above that I took yesterday.

Here is another example.  Between the two drawings, I think it looks much better once the darks are truly darkened.  That will happen with steady, even pressure, and a pencil that’s on the soft side.

side by side dragon.png

You can also see this principle with pen and ink.  Drawings with fields of black just pop out a little better and draw the eye.  I was trying for this effect when I did this lioness.  I think you will see she stands out a lot better than her stretching sister.

sleeping-lioness-postpro-1000

lioness-1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black also looks better in drawings when you use smooth fields of it, and let it truly be dark.  Here, by the way, is an example of a painting where I used black in a color setting.  It’s a book cover that had some pretty specific requirements.

Experimental C corrected 800.png

 

 

\https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/black/

Thumbnail Appeal

 

For art to impress, it’s helpful if it readily catches the viewer’s eye.

If you have your work scanned in on the computer, looking at the file thumbnails is an excellent way of quickly seeing what an art viewer sees as they pass by.

A similar effect can be had by putting the painting or drawing across the room from you and glancing at it quickly.   This is how you can truly tell if your work has good contrast and interesting composition.

What pops out at you?  What is the first thing that you see?  Is that the main focal point of your work, or can you think of ways to make the art more impactful?

 

 

Discovery