When did feeling become more important than thinking?

 

As I go about my daily life, I constantly hear people talking about their feelings. Only, they are doing this when they are making decisions that ought to be made with their minds, not their feelings.

“I feel this would be the right job to take.” “I feel this is a good deal.” “I feel this scientist has made a mistake.”

Sure, it could be brushed off as a figure of speech. But what we say betrays how we think. If we really were talking about thinking, we wouldn’t say “feel” all the time, would we?

Not only that, but I see that the result of people listening to their feelings instead of their logic is a whole host of problems, not limited to abusive behavior, mental unstability, belief based science, and the desire to control what everyone else does instead of controlling oneself.  It can even lead to financial ruin for everyone from families on up to nations.

I am certainly not exempt.  This is something I struggle with on a daily basis.

I have nothing against feelings. I just think that they need to be listened to only when they are appropriate. Just as you wouldn’t necessarily think and analyze why a kitten is so cute when she’s purring and enjoying her fuzzy mouse toy, you shouldn’t just feel when it’s time to decide what mix of proteins and vitamins to feed her for optimal health.  Yet people do that all the time when they look at the cute picture on the bag instead of reading the ingredients list.

Which one would you choose?  Would you choose to be storm-tossed, at the mercy of your feelings, and making decisions based on what feels good?  Or would you choose to be informed by your emotions, but ultimately have reason at the tiller?

3 thoughts on “When did feeling become more important than thinking?

    1. It seems to me that rationalization is still emotionally based. Now, if a person can find a hidden logic to their emotion decision, that’s great – but wouldn’t awareness of the logical reasons behind a decision be better to have in the first place?

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  1. I agree with your reply here completely. Rationalization is emotionally based and is a perversion of reason and is self deceiving and is a dishonest way of thinking. But most people most of the time when they think that they are thinking rationally are in reality doing rationalizing only. Self-deception is far more common than one would think. You or me are also not immune to this. The influence of emotions is subconscious and is not consciously detected.

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