Snack Hack: Honey Mustard Pretzels

As I was in the grocery store looking for a decent snack, I incubated a new idea.  I absolutely love mustard pretzels, but they are usually $2-3 more than I want to spend, and several extra ingredients more than I want to eat.  An idea started incubating and now it’s hatched!

Why not make my own mustard pretzels, I thought?  So I did, and now you can too.  I like making my own snack foods when I have time because I like controlling the ingredients.


I used:

1 bag of sourdough pretzel pieces, 15 ounces

Plain yellow mustard, 1/2 cup

Honey, 1/4 cup

Small bowl, whisk, large mixing bowl, sheet pan.

I started by measuring the mustard, then made a kind of cup in the mustard by coatingDSCN1598 the sides with it.  That way I could pour the honey into, straight from the jar.  I did this with half my mustard so it would fill a half cup measure in total.  It was really easy to clean the measuring cup afterwards!

Similarly, I poured a little water into my mixing bowl first, so the honey would have less chance of sticking there, too.  Don’t use much here, a quarter cup at the absolute most.  I whisked it all together then added the other 1/4 cup of mustard.  I gave it a final whisk.

I poured the pretzel pieces into the large mixing bowl, then poured the coating on top, mixing it all thoroughly with clean hands.


I placed the coated pieces on the baking sheet in a single layer, then baked in the oven for 30 minutes at 300 degrees.

If your pretzels are still damp, they may need a bit of drying on the counter or in a warm oven.  I live in a dry climate so don’t have that issue.


I found these to have a milder flavor than my favorite brand, but I liked the price and DSCN1601ingredients a lot better!

You can, of course, alter this recipe to your own tastes.  You could add cayanne or garlic, both would be amazing, change the mustard type to something else, or dream up something interesting like using ranch dressing mix as part of the recipe!

Happy crunching.


via Daily Prompt: Incubate

Love, in fact, is one of the most powerful forces in the universe.

Hello, we’d like to share a story from one of our fellow bloggers, Brittany aka Blissful Britt… Every Life Deserves a Fighting Chance In July of 2017 I said a painful goodbye to the cat that I grew up with. His name was Shampy, and I was eight years old when he entered my life.…

via Every Life Deserves a Fighting Chance — Katzenworld

Out of this world – amateur lunar photography

I have so much fun with my little Nikon.  If I brace it just right (usually on the mailbox or the hood of my car) and zoom in on the moon all the way, I can get some pretty decent shots.

Once, I used a sponge floor mop as a monopod.  That worked pretty well!  The sponge protected the camera and the handle provided some much needed stability as I propped it on the ground.

Here are a few!









If that isn’t out of this world enough, here is a photo of the moon that makes it look all strange and mysterious.

blurred moon 1

Artist tip – cleaning up your artwork

Though many like the “sketchy” style of artwork, be it a pencil drawing, charcoal work, or watercolor, one simple step you can take to pull ahead of the artist pack is to clean up your art work.

Messy lines (extra sketch lines, ink that doesn’t follow the color in a painting, splotches and smudges) can detract from an otherwise beautiful piece.  Luckily, a little care is all that’s required to turn an artwork from good to great.

It’s good to know your erasers so you can clean things up appropriately.  Most artists know about the venerable kneaded eraser, which is great for cleaning up rough textured paper.  If you are working on smooth paper, though, certain old fashioned drafting tools may work better.  You can use a white vinyl eraser, the kind with the cardboard sleeve (like the one you see above), for many applications.  It’s nice because it’s also gentle on paper but does a very good job cleaning up pencil marks.  As a bonus, the cardboard sleeve gives you a good grip and keeps your gingers clean!

Another secret weapon for cleaning up your sketches is an eraser shield.  They are small, cheap, made of metal, and perfect for taking a bit of a line while protecting the rest of the work.  They look like this:

index As you can see, you can use this to cover your art and then just erase a bit at a time.  Many artists and people who haven’t taken an old fashioned drafting class have never heard of them, especially in this day of Computer Aided Drafting.  I love mine.


Last but not least, a really good sketching tool is just a good, old fashioned mechanical pencil.  I really enjoy using one because I never have to sharpen it, I can use a variety of leads, and if I use a light touch with it, the lines are extremely easy to clean up.  It’s perfect for a sketch that I plan to ink later.  Then when I am done, I can make a nice, clean image.   I can go from this sketch to this drawing with very little trouble.

Elephant Sketch 700

Elephant Cow 900











As a last tip for people wanting to avoid messy looking artwork, I do suggest getting to know your graphics programs.  When you scan something in to the computer or photograph it, turning up the contrast even just a bit can help your black and white drawings look that much sharper and clearer.  It takes a bit of practice but is well worth the effort.

As a confession, I used to make the hairiest, sketchiest drawings ever and consider them finished work.  I don’t do that anymore.  I still sketch things out on occasion but I use those sketches as ways to develop ideas instead of thinking they are done.  Now, my erasers and mechanical pencil are my best friends.

Happy creating!

via Daily Prompt: Messy